Seven Basic Principles of Exercise

Seven Principles of Exercise

Seven Principles of Exercise

How can you not be having a good week in this beautiful weather? The sunshine completely elevates the general mood, so I hope you are managing to get outside. Today’s topic is about the seven basic principles of exercise.

Preventing heart disease

The death of Bob Crow yesterday was pretty shocking, leaving his politics aside (he was not a man with a huge fan club); he was only 52 and heart disease is largely preventable. I have a family history of heart disease (amongst some other hereditary nasties). This is a huge motivator to look after my heart, not just with training; I always ask my doctor for regular cholesterol and blood sugar tests. We have one life and it is our own ultimate responsibility to achieve the quality and quantity which is our due. This week I have been rifling through my text books and I found a really useful section outlining the seven basic principles of exercise which I thought I would share. This information should help you get the most out of your sessions and explain why you subject yourself to the mercy of a shouty, short scouser on Saturday mornings and why the classes are structured in the way they are.

Seven Basic Principles of Exercise

  • Regularity – to achieve results from training you should exercise often, ideally three to five times a week (to be fair five is a bit of a challenge). Unfortunately fitness is reversible – if you don’t use it you really do lose it.
  • Progression – The intensity and duration of the exercise must gradually increase to improve the level of fitness. There are always options and this is where “bootcamp minutes” come into play!
  • Balance – to be effective a fitness programme should include activities that address all components of fitness.
  • Variety – mix it up to avoid boredom.
  • Specificity – training should be geared toward specific goals, ie: if you want to run a marathon swimming is not going to be suitable for the main body of training.
  • Recovery – A hard day of training should be followed by an easier training day or rest day. Recovery allows the muscles to repair, grow and strengthen.
  • Overload – the work load of each exercise session must exceed the normal demands placed upon the body in order to bring about a training effect.

Bootcamp is planned for this week with the seven basic principles of exercise in mind and there are some new ideas mixed with old favourites. I have now thought of 59 methods of training (torture) stations and there must be more to come.. . .

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